Construction company Robert Woodhead is marking the completion of a six month project to refurbish one of its most recognisable buildings.  As part of the £750k project, the art deco building which has previously been used as a kitchen and dining space has been transformed to accommodate new teaching facilities.
The building has been transformed through a series of internal works to provide new teaching facilities including eight teaching rooms and a meeting space.
Fred Robson is Head of Estates at Bishop Grosseteste University. He said: “It’s great to see the refurbishment completed. The brand new teaching spaces will provide a flexible working and learning environment for our staff and students.”
Further enabling works have also been undertaken to prepare the infrastructure for a proposed second phase in the project which it is hoped will be carried out later in the year.

Matt Stone is quantity surveyor at Woodhead and has been overseeing the project, he said: “We carried out the bulk of the refurbishment works over the summer months to minimise the impact on campus. We have been delighted to have completed all the works on time and to be able to work with local contractors as part of our supply chain.”

The project, which is the first job Woodhead has undertaken for the University, was secured through the empa ii minor works construction framework. The aim of empa, which was formed by local authorities in the East Midlands, is to improve the procurement and delivery of construction projects and property maintenance for public sector bodies saving time and money for them, and in turn for council taxpayers.

Head of empa Alan Coole said: “The refurbished facilities at the Bishop Grosseteste University are outstanding and a testament to the success of delivering projects through the empa ii framework. The project has given a boost to the construction industry in Lincoln, as many local contractors and suppliers have been involved. The framework gives higher and further education organisations and public-sector bodies a route to complete construction schemes quickly, to a high standard and achieve value for money.”

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